Effective And Permanent Tips For Training Your Dog
Dogs are lovable animals. They are playful, obedient, and there for you on any occasion. Dogs make excellent pets as they are wonderful companions for anyone of any age. While dogs are great, they do require a bit of training. The tips in this article should help you with dog training.
You should only leave your dog’s food out for around fifteen minutes each day after you put it out. This helps get your dog used to a regular routine. Your dog will quickly learn to begin eating his or her food immediately, and as a result, your dog will eat fresher food and not beg for food at other times of the day.
Don’t interact with your dog when you are frustrated or angry. Simply put your dog up and take a break. Training will proceed much more efficiently when you return. Each of you will be rested, have a fresh outlook, and be ready to tackle that seemingly elusive training task once again.
Associate hand gestures with individual commands to help your dog remember what to do. While the command words themselves can be enough of a clue to tell the dog what to do – using a visual cue – provides a way for the dog to remember more easily how to perform.
Avoid using food and treats to train your dog beyond the puppy stage. Once you teach your dog to expect food for performing any task, they will refuse to do even the most basic commands without a food reward. Praising your dog warmly with words, cuddles and special playtime will get you a dog that listens without you worrying whether or not you have a treat in your pocket.
Use the time that you spend with your dog on a walk as an opportunity to reinforce your training program. Not only is this a perfect time to establish a better relationship with your pet, but it also allows you to work on different exercises together. A walk with your dog can be both enjoyable and an opportunity to learn.
The best way to teach your dog not to beg at the table is to never feed him people food. Don’t allow guests or family members to feed your dog from the table. It may look cute, but it will only encourage the dog to continue begging for scraps. Your dog will be healthier and happier if he never learns he can get food from the dinner table.
Doggy daycare may sound like a great idea for hyperactive, distracted dogs, but it may be a serious setback to your training efforts. Your dog will need structure throughout the day. While running around and socializing with other dogs will be sure to tire him out, he will not receive the structure needed to curtail any over-the-top behavior. Consider a dog-walking service to let your dog stretch his legs during the day, instead.
As stated before, dogs are lovable animals due to their playfulness and obedient nature. Dogs are always there for you and make excellent companions. With all the great qualities that dogs have, they will require training. Using the tips from this article, you can train any dog into the perfect companion.

Chiang Mai, Thailand’s Temple Of The Dogs
Into the Arms of Buddha
It was 5 p.m. and I was stalking an angel on temple grounds. As the rain started, I wondered if she would show herself at all. Chiang Mai’s rain patterns are directly correlated with the contents of my purse. The resulting meteorological phenomena means the rain could stop in a matter of seconds or pour down for days, depending on whether or not I’d brought my umbrella. I had not.
Squinting into the droplets, I glared up at the massive Chedi, a Lanna-style stupa which draws in visitors from across Northern Thailand. Sure it’s impressive, but what I want to know is: How can you have such a large building sitting there for 700 years and not install any doors? Surely it has rained here before.
Where to hide? No way would I take shelter in the two beautiful little buildings in front of me. Stunningly designed, absolutely! But each houses a wax replica of an elderly monk sitting in a clear box. File them under “way too real looking” to pass time with. What can I say? Lack of blinking disturbs me. Beside, if wax can achieve the lotus position, why can’t I?
To escape the deluge, my shelter took the form of a gazebo housing three large Buddhas. I would not be alone. One by one, temple residents trickled in. The first went straight to a mat he obviously kept laid out for these moments. Two more just sat down and licked themselves. By the time the skies opened up completely, three more temple dogs had meandered into the shelter.
Carrying dog cookies is just something I do. I could explain myself, but people either get it or never will. I tossed five treats out and turned to the sixth dog, Lek (Thai for little). She had vanished. Not possible. Would she go back out in the rain? Is there a dog door in the side of the Chedi?
I surrendered Lek’s cookie to an antique looking Weimaraner. Predictably, that’s when I spotted her. Out of the corner of my eye I noticed her sitting in the right hand of a Buddha. She yawned, nestled perfectly into Buddha’s arms and fell fast asleep. After six years of visiting Wat Chedi Luang, the temple still brings a grin to my face. Must be why I keep coming back.
Angels of Chedi Luang
Actually, as the donation box says, “It all started about ten years ago.” Ajarn Rosocon, a teacher at Chiang Mai’s Rajabaht University, decided to make the dogs of Wat Chedi Luang and the adjoining Wat Phan Tau her mission. Ajarn is Thai for teacher. Her best lessons were taught at this temple complex. Out of a potential hell these unique Buddhist sites have been transformed into a sort of canine Nirvana.
Initially, students and friends helped Ajarn Rosocon care for the dogs. They fed, sterilized, treated mange, vaccinated… whatever they could manage from the pennies (baht) they scraped together. The group was determined that the dogs of Chedi Luang and Phan Tau not suffer the life faced by so many abandoned and sick temple dogs across SE Asia.
In 2005 Ajarn Rosocon unexpectedly died. A friend, Ann Pierce, and another devoted friend/student Khun Soonthree stepped in. Adopting Rosocon’s dream as their own, they went forward, honoring a friend’s memory by helping the helpless. Ultimately, Khun Soonthree became in many eyes the “Angel of Chedi Luang.”
Touring the Temples
Wat Chedi Luang has become a refuge not just for dogs, but for all animal lovers. If travelers become overwhelmed by the sight and plight of street dogs or simply need a quiet escape they visit this ‘feel good’ temple. Try it yourself. Play tourist, take photos, pat a willing pup, or bring a picnic – it’s all good. Then at 6 p.m. watch for the angel. Over a year after Ajarn Rosocon death, Khun Soonthree still feeds and cares for the temple dogs.
Word has it she never misses a day. She was there in the rainy season when her own home flooded several times. She was there in the storm when Lek and I sought shelter. Her bright yellow rain slicker and massive pot of rice mix carried her through the tempest. If it is 6 o’clock in Chiang Mai, she’s there right now.
Most people visit Wat Chedi Luang’s temple complex for the impressive ancient Chedi. In addition, its beautiful grounds are perfect for strolling, quietly removed from the city’s frenzy. Vendors offer food and cool drink. Trees and benches offer hospitable shade. The adjoining Wat Phan Tau casts a luminous teak glow over the Buddha images it houses.
Better still, the aptly named “Monk Chat” area offer travelers a welcoming invitation to pull up a chair and, quite obviously, chat with monks. A casual atmosphere where international visitors just hang out with Buddhist monks is a fabulous forum for asking questions and learning about one another’s lives. In the background the voices of novice monks echo outward from classroom windows.
Who’s Who?
Of course, for a few of us the temples house one more special treasure – the dogs. Not all are social. Not all are loyal. Some are downright ornery. But to know the “who’s who” of Chedi Luang canines adds to the fun of any visit. True most tourists barely notice them – except to do a quick sidestep away. Like many regulars, however, I’ve given most nicknames.
Take Ren and Stumpy for example. Ren, a diminutive twig of a dog, is the duo’s personality. Stumpy, who has a front leg contorted up underneath, provides a bit of size (a valuable asset in the world of temple dog politics) to the team. Side by side the pair can be found on a building patio overlooking the Chedi’s north face.
Ren works her magic, charming the visitors with enthusiastic greetings. Then Stumpy shows his handicap, Abracadabra! Any traveler with half a heart makes a beeline for the ubiquitous ‘5 baht meat-on-a-stick’ vendor. “No need to heat it sir.”
Next, is Lady. She works with a local artist by delicately charming customers to his postcard rack. From there they get a close-up look at his lovely hand sketched works. I suspect Lady pulls in a commission.
Friendly Little Lek hovers at ordinary in the looks department. But every dog is beautiful when they sleep in Buddha’s arms.
Not all is perfect. When I first saw Hiccup, I thought he had just been poisoned. Now I know the perpetual hack must be a medical problem. A bone lodged somewhere or… I can not say. While not overly social, Hiccup is stunningly photogenic.
At the front entrance of Chedi Luang are the three Golden Boys. At least I think they are boys. They rarely stand. This is the first place Khun Soonthree feeds each evening. Looking at the girth of the Golden Boys, it’s a tad surprising there is any food left for any other temple dogs.
Across from them lives Lucy – the Teddy Bear dog. Had you seen her before her haircut, you would have expected to find seams and a price tag.
No one knows exactly how many dogs live at Chedi Luang, 60+ perhaps. Other notable characters include Cookie Monster, whose cantankerous attitude and dull looks are well compensated for by the fact that he is the only one who actually likes the dull old dry dog cookies I bring. Apparently others prefer Khun Soonthree’s cooking to mine.
Living on the north face of the Chedi is Scar and her three puppies. Some dogs turn up at the temple pregnant. Still, her puppies Goldie, Blackie, and Coco Puff are well cared for.
The latest I have notice is named, “Oh Crap, Where Are My Ears?” Oh Crap…, or Ears for short, must be an abandoned pet. He is way too forlorn looking. It’s as though he desperately wants a master. However, he’s willing to settle for jerky treats – or bigger ears.
Chubby, a pseudo red Chow, and Pigeon Chaser top off the list of charmers over at Wat Phan Tau. Pigeon Chaser will pass any domestic chicken, but heaven help the wild birds if he ever sprouts wings. The young monks at Phan Tau are especially loving toward their smaller population of temple dogs. It is truly a joy to watch them interact. Saffron robes and happy tails flourish side by side.
The influence Chedi Luang has on animal lovers is best summed up by Ann Pierce. A former volunteer with the dogs, Ann has returned to California, but wrote this in an email interview:
“I cannot begin to articulate the impact the dogs, Ajarn Rosocon, Khun Soonthree, Wat Chedi Luang and all the other people I met through my time in Chiang Mai has had on me. I’m a very different person because of my experiences. My dream is to one day move back to Chiang Mai and continue helping the animals, no matter how frustrating it is at times.”
Getting There
You can take a Tuk Tuk to visit Wat Chedi Luang. Most drivers know of this popular temple. On foot enter the old city from the famous Tha Phae Gate (east moat gate) and continue straight up Ratchadamnoen Road about four blocks to the first street light – Phra Pokklao Rd. Turn left. You’ll immediately see the spectacular Teak Wood Temple of Wat Phan Tau on your right. Take a look inside. Wat Chedi Luang’s larger complex is located next door.
Please remember Wats are Buddhist Temples first and foremost. Dress conservatively and behave respectfully. They don’t have to let the visitors or the dogs stay. Honor yourself by the example you set.
How Can You Help?
Visit Chedi Luang, have a great time, then spread the word.
Feeding starts at the main entrance between 5:30 and 6:00 each night. Stop by and show Khun Soonthree your appreciation of her work.
Please make a donation in one of the temples three Dog Donation Boxes, set up around the Chedi. Your money goes to food, vaccinations, mange treatment, sterilization of females (and males when it can be afforded), and general care.
The main Wat is currently undergoing a massive restoration. Making a donation to support the construction work, the temple and the temple’s school is good for all the residents – two and four legged (or 3.5 – sorry Stumpy).
Getting the Most from Your Visit!
Never approach any dog that seems reluctant. Get acquainted slowly with the friendly animals. Their continued socialization, or at least apathy to people, keeps them from wearing out their welcome at the temple.
Do not bring too many good tasting cookies: bacon, pork rings, a side of beef… The bigger dogs will follow and fights can ensue with defenseless smaller ones. Dry old dog cookies rate low on the taste scale. In other words, they are a perfect cheap way to give snacks to those that will eat them eventually. If in doubt, donate the money instead. It goes to the right place.
Helping Dogs in Chiang Mai
If you live in Thailand, consider helping change the world one temple at a time. Get advice form angels and/or adopt your own temple – with permission of the monks. Make it a family, business, class or club project. Work with a reputable vet. Dr. Nook in Chiang Mai is aces!
Other organizations that help pets in the Chiangmai area temples include Lanna Dog Rescue and Care for Dogs. Both have web sites and are always looking for volunteers or donations of funds, foods and materials.
In addition, Care for Dogs also has a wonderful shelter offering adoptions of healthy rescued dogs and puppies to good homes. Remember, for each new pet that finds a family, space is made for a suffering dog to be brought into their facility. What a beautiful way to help one – dog at a time.

You love your dog and you also care for your possessions. Unfortunately your dog does not value your belongings as you do, and anything that looks chew-able will be chewed on. This article will provide proven tips and tricks that have been known to help eliminate unwanted dog chewing.
One tip to keep in mind when training your dog is to be firm with orders and do not overuse your commands. This is important because if you over-saturate your commands, your dog will not be as responsive. Only give your dog orders when you are looking for a response.
Show your dog what is your territory and that you are leader of that territory. If your dog sits in your spot and you sit elsewhere, or if he lays in the middle of the doorway so that you step over him, your dog thinks he is the leader. Do not be violent, but you should nudge your dog calmly to get up each time so that he understands it is your territory, and you are the leader.
House training a new puppy is a lengthy process that should be handled with consistency. Make sure you take the puppy out on a set schedule, and remember that puppies have tiny bladders, and need out more frequently than adult dogs. Consistency in the early days of training will avoid lots of accidents in the long run.
Is your dog eating a nutritionally-sound diet? Like children, dogs can become hyperactive, inattentive and even a little bit bratty when their diet isn’t up to par. Consider changing your dog’s diet to something more species-appropriate, and he’ll have long-lasting, consistent energy all day. Check with your vet about any specific nutritional needs he might need attending to!
If your dog suffers from separation anxiety and gets restless when you are about to leave the house, you should feed your dog right before you leave. This will keep your dog busy while you prepare and distract it from the stressful situation. This should make the separation much easier.
Any time that you are training one of your dogs, whether for behavior or simply to learn a new trick, it is essential that you ensure you have their attention first. This will help them to learn that you are the one in control and it also helps establish respect.
Doggy daycare may sound like a great idea for hyperactive, distracted dogs, but it may be a serious setback to your training efforts. Your dog will need structure throughout the day. While running around and socializing with other dogs will be sure to tire him out, he will not receive the structure needed to curtail any over-the-top behavior. Consider a dog-walking service to let your dog stretch his legs during the day, instead.
In conclusion, you need to stop your dog from chewing on all of your stuff. This will not only prevent your dog from getting injured, but will also save you money and frustration. Follow the tips provided in this article and you should be able to effectively train your dog to stop unnecessary chewing.

Ten Tips for Dog Owners on the Road in a RV
Motor homes usually have a driver, a passenger, maybe a few kids and at least one dog. It’s a prerequisite that to own a motor home you need at least one dog. Don’t be surprised when you see RV dealers matching a breed to a particular model in the future.
Taking a RV trip with your pooch should and will be pleasant if you:
Keep your dog safe; put his leash on before you open the door. Dogs are excited as soon as their home on the road stops and they want out! But not every place you stop will be safe; on coming traffic, glass on the side of the road, and other dogs near by could cause your dog to run on to the road.
Carry a health certificate issued by our veterinarian that clearly identifies the dog and certifies that the dog have been vaccinated against rabies during the preceding 36-month period. This is a must if you plan to travel from the United States to Canada. Different Canadian provinces may have different requirements. Be sure to contact the government of the provinces you plan to visit. It is rare to need the health certificate when traveling in the 48 states but if there is an incident both the certificate and the rabies vaccination certificate could help a bunch.
Respect all the rules of campsites and parks. That can mean a special Poop Park or a Dog Run Area and leash rules. You don’t want to be asked to move on if your dog misbehaves or is running amuck. Dogs in a new strange place will follow their nose so keep that leash on so he will not get lost. And be prepared to pay extra for your pooch. Some camps and parks have a “dog fee.”
Always carry poop bags (zip lock sandwich plastic bags for smaller breeds and larger plastic bags for bigger breeds). The trick, using the zip lock bags, is to turn the bag inside out, pick up the poop, turning the bag right side again and zip the contents (and smell) closed. Always try to locate the nearest dumpster or trash can instead of bringing it back into your motor home.
D-rings are great! Hook it on his leash and then hook the D-ring to your belt loop. You’ll have both hands free. When in camp, tie a long rope to a boulder, picnic table, tree or the bumper of the motor home and tie the other end to the hand rail just outside the RV door. Next time your pooch needs to go out, get his leash, clamp on the D-ring and hook it on the rope and out he goes like a little paratrooper. D-rings make it easy to tie up the dog when you go into a store or shop. Just loop the leash around any post or tree and use the D-ring to secure the dog; this prevents those knots that seem to get tighter by the minute as your dog pulls on the leash.
When you go on a tour or shopping and have to leave your pooch in the RV make sure you leave the vents open, have fresh water out, and a few puddle pads on the floor just in case there is an accident. Open windows can become an escape route; right through the screen and a long way down to the ground, so only leave the windows open an inch.
The inside of a motor home is usually small and dogs do not get out as much as if they were at home. Brush your dog outside to remove dander, and loose fur, it’s much easier to let the wind take it away than to clog up your vacuum.
If you’re on the road for long periods check the local yellow pages for a dog groomer in the town you are visiting. Or ask at the campground or RV Park for a recommendation of a nearby groomer. A better solution than doggy day care, while you tour a museum or go to a ball game your dog will be pampered and clean when you pick him up.
Give your dog a special place, like a dog carrier or a dog pad or bed this provides him with a secure and comfortable place when he is feeling scared or tired.
If your dog gets nervous or anxious while traveling try Dramine™ and St. John’s Worth. Ask your vet for the amounts to be given based on your pooch’s body weight.
Dogs enrich our lives in everyway and they deserve a road trip too. Besides, they’re a lot easier than kids and dogs don’t keep saying over and over “Are we there yet?” or “where’s McDonald’s?” The only draw back, dogs can’t use the bathroom so they compel us to “stop and smell the roses” every so often.

How To Overcome FEAR
Dr. Joe Vitale’s new book comes out this week. Here’s a brand new article he wrote, which he is giving you as a gift to share with you, or (if you have one) your list and your website visitors. If you have any questions, let me know.
-Jason Mangrum
I’m in Chicago attending a Dan Kennedy event. At the first break a young man stops me, saying he is one of my subscribers and a big fan. I’m flattered. We talk. During the brief conversation, he confesses that fear is what stops him from achieving anything.
Interesting. Just that very morning I had breakfast with Paul Hartunian, famous publicity expert, when he told me, “There is no such thing as fear.”
“There isn’t?” I asked Paul.
“No. You are born with only two fears,” Paul explained. “The fear of loud noises and the fear of falling. You lose those early on. Any other fears are created by you. They aren’t real.” “How do you get rid of fear?”
“Stop it.”
“Stop it?”
“Just stop it,” Paul said. “Say you have a fear of bridges. If I put one million dollars in cash on the other side and said you could have it if you walked across the bridge, nude, in front of a crowd of people, you’d do it. Why? Because the reward is greater than the pain. Make the rewards greater and the fears will vanish.”
I told the young man before me the same thing.
I then went on to add that most people in business have a fear of success, or a fear of failure. “I was just in a seminar with Ted Nicholas,” I went on. “Ted said he had failed many times, and what he learned is that nothing bad ever happens to you when you fail. Instead, you get life’s greatest lessons.”
Of course, Ted is known as the four billion dollar man because he is now a legend in direct marketing. “As for the fear of success,” I told my new friend in Chicago, “what I’ve learned is that the more successful I am, the more I can help myself, my family, and the world.” In the last week alone I had made contributions to a new children’s foundation dedicated to helping babies suffering from a stroke at birth, and I made donations to Paul Hartunian’s dog rescue work.
“Success enables me to help myself as well as everyone else,” I said. “When you realize the good you can do as a success, the fear evaporates.” I saw a light come on in the eyes of the fellow before me. He seemed to get it. He seemed to realize that fear was stopping him, but that he was the one creating it, so he could be the one to let it go. As Dan Kennedy said in Chicago, “There is no limit to the money available. The pie is infinite. It’s up to you to go scoop it up.” Fear? Stop it.
You’ve got a life to live, and people to help. Go for it.
by Dr. Joe Vitale, Author
The Attractor Factor – www.AttractorFactor.com

Selling Luxury Products in a Dogs World
One of the fastest growing industries in the United States today is the pet industry. The industry as a whole has increased 20% over the past 5 years and is projected continued growth in the upcoming years. Over the past 10 years, the pet industry has grown to a $34 billion dollar industry. This exceeds what we spend on candy and toys. The candy industry has become a $25 billion dollar industry while the toys are a $20 billion dollar industry.
Pet owners are now professional couples who are opting for pets versus children, retired couples and empty nesters. All with disposable income to spend on their furry little friend.
The fastest growing category with the most opportunity for growth is luxury for pets. After all, now we can get a massage for our pets, an aromatherapy spa treatment, doggy day care is a must in the city and you can even have them picked up by a Rolls Royce to take them for their weekly manicure pawdicure. Even luxury hotels are now offering special menus for our furry companions.
For pet retailers, it is important to understand what the expectations are of the luxury client. Who is the luxury client and what is it that they have come to expect?
The luxury client shops at Chanel, Gucci, Luis Vuitton, Prada and Neiman Marcus to name a few. She stays in 4 and 5 star hotels. She eats at the finest restaurants. She wears designer and she shops designer boutiques because of the experience. She is not price resistent. So what is the experience that she expects you ask?
1. Know her name when she enters the store. Make sure that you and your staff know and understand her lifestyle. She expects service and expects to be waited on.
2. The luxury client expects to work with knowledgable fashion oriented sales associates that understand how to sell a luxury product and are knowledgable in features, advantages and benefits. These sales associates also have an appreciation for luxury items and often purchase for themselves. Associates such as these are seen as credible sources to these clients.
3. Luxury is about an experience. The experience takes them away from their everyday world. The experience may include a glass of champagne or wine, cheese and crackers or tea and scones. A beautiful scent and soothing music as they enter into the environment helps to enhance the experience.
4. Merchandising a luxury product involves a clean presentation of the merchandise that is dust free and featured beautifully in the boutique. Lighting that highlights the product is critical to enhancing the shopping experience.
5. Follow through and communication with the client is paramount. This would include a thank you note after she purchases or stops by the store. Calling her when new product arrives. Calling her on her birthday, knowing important events in her life such as her anniversary, knowing the name of her husband and children. All are about the personal attention and care that you and your team provide.
Most importantly, understand what designer products mean in the pet world. A handbag pet carrier for example should have an average price point of $600.00+. www.designerpaws.com features carriers made of 100% Italian leather and are handmade. In pet clothing, an average price point of over $150.00, and pet beds should be at an average price point of over $400.00. Too many vendors are promoting designer products which in reality are poor in quality and construction and are priced well below a designer price point. Be cautious of what you carry in your store that is featured as designer as this can very well turn away the client that you are looking to attract. Most importantly, staff your store with people that understand how to attract, sell and grow a luxury client base.

Bed & Breakfasts That Welcome Four Legged Guests
Beautiful antique furniture, big fluffy robes, extravagant breakfasts, and intimate settings are what most people bring to mind when thinking of bed and breakfast inns. Handmade doggie treats, however, is one luxurious amenity that one would not normally include. The truth is that more and more inns are accepting, as well as pampering four legged guests. Here is some information about how you and your pet can have a relaxing stay at a bed and breakfast.
If you decide to take your pet with you to stay at a bed and breakfast, it is important to plan your itinerary around them. It is key to book accommodations that are pet friendly. Visit www.BnBFinder.com/PetsWelcome, which lists more than 400 pet friendly inns in 300 cities around the country. With so many to choose from it is easy to find the perfect bed and breakfast for you and your pet.
When booking, tell the innkeeper that you want to bring your pet. Some inns have policies regarding the size, weight, and type of pet that they can accommodate. Make sure you find out if the innkeeper requires any special deposits or extra fees to cover your pet’s stay. Also, find out if there are animals that live at the inn to avoid any potential problems for your pet. Ask about designated rooms for people staying with their furry friends. These rooms are often located on the ground floor for easier access.
Upon arrival remind the innkeeper that you are traveling with a special guest. Some inns provide a goody bag for pets that include treats, pick up bags, and information on local veterinarians and pet friendly establishments. Ask if there are any restricted and/or designated places for pets both indoors and outdoors. Check with the innkeeper about walking your pet through the gardens, along the shore, or on trails. This way, you and your furry friend can take in the lovely atmospheres that help make bed and breakfasts so special.
As you will see when you get to your room, innkeepers put a great deal of effort in maintaining a beautiful, immaculate house, and it is your responsibility to keep it that way. Wipe your pet’s paws every time he comes in from outside. Discourage him from sleeping on the furniture and cover all furniture and the beds he might go on. Many inns provide special sheets, towels, and beds for your pet so that he too can relax in comfort. Put fresh water and food on a mat if you are feeding in the room and try to keep your pet on the same feeding schedule you would at home. Some inns will even provide him with fancy crystal dishes and homemade food and treats to let him know how pampered he truly is.
When you leave your room, refrain from leaving your pet behind. Most bed and breakfasts have policies against leaving your pet unattended. Crate your pet to avoid any unwanted situations if you are permitted to leave him in the room, and be sure that all employees of the inn know that your pet will be in there. Some inns offer in-room pet sitting services, as well as doggie daycare areas that allow your pet to socialize and play while you are off premises. When outdoors, keep your pet on a leash and always clean up after him. Respect all the guests at the inn and their feelings about animals.
At the end of your stay at the inn, inspect your room for any damage your pet may have caused. Notify the innkeeper and volunteer to pay for any repairs. Pet friendly inns know that sometimes an accident may happen and would prefer you to let them know right after it happens so they may deal with it accordingly.
Doesn’t it sound nice to be able to go on a relaxing, intimate vacation and be able to bring your pet along? Many bed and breakfast innkeepers have said that some of their most memorable guests are pets and their owners. Hopefully your visit at the bed and breakfast will be just as memorable!

A Dog Day Care Business Can Be a Lot Of Fun!
If you love dogs and you enjoy making money then a dog day care business may be a very good fit for you!
Let me ask you a question, “Can you imagine starting your very own dog day care business?” If you asked yourself that question and still aren’t sure, let me give you a bit of dog day care business advice….
First, make sure that you truly love dogs. Second, study your area and see if there is a large dog population. Finally, get some legal advice.
You see, if you love and care for the dogs that you keep, the chances of your dog day care business being a huge success is much better than if you are just starting a dog day care business for the money.
Now the reason that I mentioned studying your area to make sure there are plenty of dogs is simple, no dogs equals no money for your dog day care business!
Here’s a dog day care business tip: See how many veterinarians are in your area. Also, be sure to look in the paper at the classifieds section.
Finally, I mentioned obtaining proper legal advice. A local attorney in your area can give you valuable information about starting a dog day care business in your area. You want to make sure you comply with all laws.
A dog day care business can be a lot of fun! Just make sure you enjoy dogs, research your area, and always obtain good legal advice.
Good luck in your dog day care business endeavor!

What To Do If You Have Trouble Training Your Dog
While most dogs are agreeable to learning basic rules of obedience if started at a young age, every once in a while a dog and a master just won’t be able to come together to find a successful training routine. This can be extremely frustrating for both parties involved. Fortunately, there are many outside sources that can help with this.
The most popular are “doggie daycare” or “doggie boot camps”, pet care programs very similar to child daycares. At a dog daycare, dogs are paired with trainers for an hour or two each day and taught basic obedience; sit, come, don’t bite the nice salesman. Once the dogs have mastered that, more advanced training is often available. The focus here is not entirely on training, however. Day cares for dogs are intended to provide a safe, happy place for a dog to go while their owner is at work, and they allow the animals plenty of play time, often complete with canine playground, as well as an in-depth grooming regimen daily; they will clip the dog’s nails, clean their ears and eyes, bathe them and trim their coats when it is needed. More in-depth grooming options may be available; however, this varies by facility.
Doggie boot camp is becoming increasingly popular as a way to deal with animals that have simply refused to be trained. A group of professional trainers will work with your dog daily, for several hours a day, teaching them to obey basic commands. Each facility’s methods of doing this are different; some use punishment based techniques, while others use rewards and positive reinforcement. This may be a boarding program, where your dog goes to a separate facility for a length of time, sleeping there, or it may be done as a day school, where the owner drops the dog off in the morning and picks them up in the afternoon. Some programs work with the owners as well; you and your dog will have a session with the trainer in which they will teach you to teach your dog to listen, and how to work together without being frustrated.
Canine boot camp can seem like a gift from the heavens, but owners should be careful. Beware of programs that claim to give you a perfectly trained animal within a matter of days; while a dog may be able to learn a trick or two in that time, it is unlikely the training will stick with them once they have returned home. Observation of their training techniques is important as well; while results are important, excessive force should not be used.
Regardless of which program you decide to use, investigate the facility and the staff carefully. Confirm the credentials of the staff, and that they have been trained to handle any emergencies that may arise while your dog is in their care. Be sure that the facility is clean, of adequate size and does not possess any features which may be hazardous to the dogs. Each dog should have its separate space, with plenty of time allotted for feeding and rest, and an isolation area should be available for any animal who becomes uncontrollable.
Information on these programs can be obtained online, through your veterinarian, and through the SPCA.

A Dog Day Care Franchise – Is It Really Worth It?
When you take into account that there are over 68,000,000 dogs in the United States alone, you can see why many people consider taking advantage of a dog day care franchise.
However, before you even think about a dog day care franchise, please do a self evaluation and make sure you are doing it for the right reasons.
A dog day care franchise is a tremendous responsibility. It requires a lot of time, a lot of effort, and a lot of resources.
Now, please understand that I am not implying that a dog day care franchise is not a wise choice for you. I am only trying to help provide you with some useful dog day care franchise information.
Here are some general questions to ask yourself before starting a dog day care franchise:
– Do I really love dogs enough to start a dog day care franchise?
Yes, I realize like many opportunities in life, you have the potential to make good profits with a dog day care franchise regardless of whether you really care for the dogs or not.
However, if you don’t have a love and passion for dogs, your success with a dog day care franchise will more than likely be limited.
– Next, are you willing to foot the bill for all of the necessary dog day care franchise resources?
Yes, even a dog day care franchise that comes with all the necessary information and tools is still going to cost you. Especially, if you are renting a building for leasing land.
These are just some of the reasons why I encourage people to do their research before taking advantage of a dog day care franchise.
So if you’ve read this article and find that a dog day care f